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You love your children and want them to have the best experience growing up. You know that going through a divorce might make that harder than expected, but you think that this situation can also help them learn and grow.

You and your spouse are working on a parenting plan now, but you’re having a lot of trouble with arguments and disputes. You can’t seem to settle on a plan that works for all of your children.

What can you do?

Something that may help in your situation is to talk to your attorney about unusual parenting plans they’ve seen work for situations like yours. For example, if you have a teen, and elementary-school aged child and a toddler, the reality is that the same schedule may not work for all of them. Is there a way to set up a schedule that gives them some custody days together in the same home but then differs on other dates? Do you have family or friends who can help fill in the gaps on days when you and your ex-spouse are both unavailable? These are things to think about that can help you approach creating a custody plan from a different angle.

The most important thing to keep in mind is that you need to do what is in your children’s best interests. If they are very close with one another, it may not make sense to split up their schedules. If your older child needs space to study away from your youngest child, perhaps an alternate schedule would be beneficial. This is all something to think about as you work through your custody plan. If you continue to have disputes, your attorney may be able to provide some other options.